I’m on an Ender 3 support group on Facebook, and nearly all the comments in this group asking for help are from people who did not follow the instructions when doing the setup on their Ender 3’s in the first place. Those who are meticulous about getting the frame absolutely square and the belts as tight as they can get them without binding everything up are getting superior results.

If you’ve just bought an Ender 3, there are a few things you’ll probably want to do or try at some point.

  1. Make sure your frame is square. I’m serious. 90% of the problems you’re likely to have with your prints will derive from not having properly assembled the gantry.
  2. Replace the plastic extruder clamp with a metal one. They’re cheap, usually under $20, but the filament tends to saw through the plastic clamps over time. Sooner or later you’ll want to replace it.
  3. Get a silent controller board. This makes your printer so quiet that you’ll have to do an eyeball check to see if it’s still even printing, it’s so quiet. They’re about $40.
  4. Print a fan cowling for your CPU box to keep crap from falling into your controller box through the vent fan.
  5. Print a muffling fan cowling for your power supply box. This will drop the fan noise made by the machine by half.
  6. Order more bowden tube, and more nozzles. These things wear out, and after about four to five months of use, they’ll start to screw up your prints.
  7. Get a glass build plate, and by this I mean go to your local dollar store, and buy a cheap 9×9 square picture frame. Take the glass out of it, and throw the rest of the frame away. The picture frame glass is a quarter the weight of the official Creality glass bed and causes far fewer problems with Y-axis ringing due to its much lower inertia.
  8. Don’t use tape. Tape is a substitute for proper bed leveling, and solves problems that haven’t existed since the introduction of heated beds.
  9. If you’re having particular problems getting your PLA to stick to the glass, try a fine mist of Aquanet. It’s cheap, and compared to fiddling with the bed leveling to get it precise to the last 0.01mm, it’s a fast solution that gets you on your way and printing parts again. Some purists think this is cheating, because you can resolve sticking issues with better bed leveling, but if you have to get the parts out the door, there’s nothing wrong with doing something quick that works so you can get on with your life.
  10. Buy eSun PLA+ filament for printing. It runs about 10 degrees C hotter than the usual stuff, produces much more precise, clean prints, and costs exactly the same as whatever you’re using.
  11. If you think vibration damping is something you need, buy a $5 yogo mat, cut it into 1 foot squares, and put a stack of four or five squares under your printer. It will kill a lot of the noise and vibration your printer makes, and may well improve the quality of your prints.
  12. Make sure your belts are as tight as you can get them. Don’t worry, you won’t break them. Tight belts means more precise motion and better prints.
  13. Experiment with printing at stupidly thin layer heights. I started experimenting with 0.1mm layer heights, and people I show the prints to, even other 3d printer owners, are amazed that these are 3d printed objects.
  14. Special fan housings can help a bit with bridging, but generally speaking, they don’t improve print quality very much and are probably not worth the effort.
  15. It is possible for an Ender 3 to not want to print because it’s too cold to start with. If your printer lives in the garage or workshop, as mine does, it’s probably not in a heated environment – and that means that it can get down to under 10°C and chill your temperature sensors to the point where the printer’s firmware thinks something must be broken, and you’ll get a MINTEMP error. You could have a bad thermister, or a bad connection trace to it on the motherboard, or a bad connector, but the first thing to try is just bringing the thing inside and letting it warm up a bit. I did this and once I got the temperature of the printer up above about 8°C, the printer realized its sensors weren’t broken, and it started right up.
  16. Get a Raspberry Pi and load it up with a webcam and Octoprint. Being able to run your printer without having to be in the same room with it is heaven.

Don’t bother with trying to print vibration damping feet, special angled mounting arms for your filament spools. By in large these do nothing but waste your time.